If a permanent case of the runs isn't enough to keep you away from proton pump inhibitors, maybe this will do the trick: These drugs can also leave you crippled for the rest of your life.

I've told you before how PPIs can block the absorption of both calcium and magnesium, leaving you high and dry when it comes to the two nutrients your bones need most.

Now, a new study shows what actually happens to those bones (in case it's not already obvious). A rock-solid new study out of Harvard that used data on some 80,000 nurses tracked since 1982 found that these meds can boost the risk of hip fractures by more than a third.

Think that's bad? The increase in risk shoots up to 50 percent in women who take these drugs for at least six years.

Now, if you've never taken a PPI you probably think it's nuts to take them for six years. And you're right -- it's nuts to take them for even six minutes.

But these meds are like crack for heartburn patients.

The more you take them, the more you need them -- because every time you try to stop, the stomach acid comes back with a vengeance.

It's called acid rebound, and it's not a return of the original problem. It's a worsening of it that's CAUSED by the drugs, leading to a vicious cycle of meds that can go on for years or even decades.

The best way to avoid all that is to not get started on these drugs in the first place.

I've found the simplest way to get relief from stomach acid problems is with eight ounces of freshly squeezed cabbage juice, taken as often as necessary.

If that doesn't work, you'll need to make some bigger changes. I have everything you need to know about out-of-control stomach acid problems -- and how to stop them cold -- in the August 2009 issue of the Douglass Report.

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