female Viagra

  1. Beware the 'female Viagra'

    New push for female sex med

    Watch out, ladies! Big Pharma is trying to get into your pants -- and like a lowlife sexual predator, they're not going to give up until they get in.

    The newest attempt at a "female Viagra" is a phony-baloney chemical estrogen aimed at women suffering from weak and dried-out ladyparts after menopause. It's a condition called dyspareunia, and it makes sex painful -- sometimes (but not always) so painful women avoid sex.

    The drug, Osphena, is supposed to make you stronger and wetter "down there" so sex becomes enjoyable again.

    And if it really and truly worked -- and worked without risks -- I'd be the first to say, "just do it."

    But in one major clinical trial in which dyspareunia symptoms were measured on a three-point scale, women on the drug had a 1.55-point improvement -- which sounds terrific, until you see that women on a placebo had a 1.29-point improvement.

    Maybe that's an improvement on paper -- but it's not one you'd notice in the bedroom, which is why one review finds the drug helps just 14 percent of the women who take it.

    That's it -- and with that minor benefit comes major risks such as thrombotic and hemorrhagic stroke, deep vein thrombosis, endometrial cancer and more. The backers of the drug say these conditions are rare, but some of the other side effects aren't rare at all: The drug will triple your risk of hot flashes and could even cause you to ooze down there.

    Yes... ooze.

    If that's your idea of sexy, then maybe you can give the drug a try.

    If you'd like to get back to enjoying sex without the ooze, on the other hand, there's a much safer, easier and cheaper solution you'll find in just about any drug store, big box chain store or grocery store in the nation.

    It's plain old lubricant.

    If you're too embarrassed to buy it yourself, send your husband. Trust me, he'll be happy to do it if it means more sex.

  2. Failed med tested for sexy side effects

    What do you do when a med fails to deliver? Market the side effects!

    That little trick's been in the Big Pharma playbook for years... and the latest example is a failed antidepressant called flibanserin.

    Researchers claim that although this med didn't help anyone beat the blues, some of the women who took it noticed an increase in libido.

    So now instead of a failure, it's being touted as the "female Viagra," as if that's something to be proud of. But that notion is little more than tricky marketing – because while there's often a physical reason behind a man's inability to perform, such as a circulation issue that makes it hard to sustain an erection, women with sexual dysfunction often face another issue entirely: a lack of desire.

    And sometimes, a lack of desire simply means a woman doesn't want to have sex. While I'm all for an active, healthy sex life at any age, using chemical trickery to induce lust is practically pharmacological rape... forcing the body to say "yes" even when the mind says "no."

    Early research found that this med has a range of unpleasant side effects, including headaches, fatigue, dizziness, nausea, diarrhea and urinary infections.

    And if it gets approved as a female sex drug, I wouldn't be surprised if the other side effects include feelings of deep regret and shame when women realize they were chemically conned into sexual encounters.

    Ladies, if you want a little help loosening up in the bedroom, try a glass of wine before you turn to any meds. As I wrote a few weeks ago, a drink or two before you hit the sack with your beloved has been shown to help women feel more relaxed and adventurous between the sheets. (Click here to read "Drink up to warm up in the bedroom.")

    You can also try your hand at any one of the many natural aphrodisiacs. There's a reason strawberries and chocolate have always been linked to romance: The two are naturally loaded with nutrients and amino acids that help boost desire.

    Just stay away from failed drugs – and, for the record, that includes Viagra too. That nasty little med was originally designed to lower blood pressure. The side effects included powerful erections – including the kind that can't be relieved with sex alone, but require emergency-room treatments with sharp instruments.

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